The new Porsche 919 Hybrid

2017 Porsche 919 Hybrid

Drive system

As part of the package of enhancement measures, the Porsche engineers have boosted the efficiency and performance of the drivetrain. The transmission on the front and rear axle, the combustion engine, the electric motor and the energy recovery systems have all been optimised, but the basic principle behind the drive system is unchanged: The rear axle of the 919 is driven by an extremely compact two-liter V4 combustion engine. The engine combines downsizing turbo technology with efficient direct fuel injection; it delivers just under 500 hp and is the most efficient combustion engine in the history of Porsche to date. Two different energy recovery systems – a braking energy recovery system on the front axle plus an exhaust energy recovery system – feed a lithium-ion battery, which in turn powers an electric motor capable of supplying additional power of over 400 hp to the front axle on demand. The 919 Hybrid, developed in Weissach, is the only prototype to recover energy during acceleration as well as braking. It achieves a system power of more than 900 hp, profiting from the enormous traction generated when the car accelerates out of bends with a further 400 hp of power on the front axle, transforming the 919 into an all-wheel drive.

Approximately 60 percent of the recovered energy comes from the KERS (Kinetic Energy Recovery System) on the front-axle brakes. The remaining 40 percent is generated by the exhaust energy recovery system. An average of 80 percent of the braking energy recovered from the front axle is immediately converted to drive energy. If the combustion engine was required to supply this electrical power, it would need to boost its output by over 100 hp, which would increase the fuel consumption of the 919 by more than 20 percent. At Le Mans, this would equate to an extra liter of fuel per lap. A further advantage of the highly efficient recuperation system is that it enables the 919 to perform with smaller and lighter brakes – a characteristic that not only reduces weight, but also air resistance, as smaller brakes require less cooling air.

The 919 will start again in the highest energy efficiency class

To recover exhaust energy, a small turbine is fitted in the exhaust tract. This turbine runs at a speed of more than 120,000 rpm, powering a generator. Just like the energy recovered from the front brakes, the energy generated is stored in the lithium-ion battery until it is needed. The driver can access this stored energy on demand at the push of a button – using it to boost the car as it speeds out of a cornering maneuver while simultaneously replenishing the energy from the exhaust gas generated during acceleration. To ensure that the turbine functions just as efficiently at lower speeds, when exhaust pressure is low, the turbine features variable turbine geometry. In spite of the sophisticated technology on board, the engineering team was still able to achieve a weight reduction in the exhaust system.

Seidl: “Our aim was to ensure that the vehicle weight did not exceed that of the previous year’s vehicle, in spite of the innovative new technologies we added – from chassis and body elements to the powertrain updates.”

The 919 will start again in the highest energy efficiency class prescribed by the regulations. This means that the car can use 8 megajoules of recovered energy over the 8.4 mile track in Le Mans, subject to the restriction that it may only consume a maximum of 4.31 liters of fuel to do so. Both consumption values are closely monitored and totalled up after each lap.